biology

Gut microbiota has been shown to be crucial for liver repair

A new study shows that a lack of specific bacteria in the gut stalls liver regeneration – a life-saving process in the body. Our tummy is home to a menagerie of tiny microbes, such as viruses, fungi, and bacteria, which form our microbiome, a symbiotic entity that plays many roles in our body, including the […]

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Researchers have just uncovered a whole new part of the brain

A new study has discovered a previously unknown structure, a few cells thick, that surrounds the brain. A newfound anatomical structure has been discovered in the brain, which appears to play an essential role in the brain’s waste disposal and immune systems, acting as a protective barrier and harboring immune cells that watch for toxic

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New nanonets target, trap, and kill specific bacteria

The nanonets could be used instead of antibiotics once fully developed. The microscopic nets consist of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that form a mesh when they detect certain chemicals in the bacterial cell membrane. Once the AMPs have attached themselves to the bacteria via these chemical sites, they attract other peptides, self-organizing to project long, interwoven

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Injectable tissue provides relief from chronic back pain in humans–could cut out the need for opioids

The new treatment cures the source of back pain, not just the symptoms. An injection comprising pulverized vertebral discs has successfully been used to treat degenerative disc disease, one of the world’s most common medical conditions. The therapy was shown to regrow the discs while reducing inflammation and pain, significantly improving the patient’s mobility and

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Human brain organoids successfully integrate into the mouse cortex and respond to visual stimuli

Could these mini-brain ‘grafts’ be used to repair brain injuries in the future? In a world’s first, researchers have shown that human brain organoids transplanted into live animals’ brains successfully formed human-mouse synaptic connections and reacted to visual stimuli. The results, made possible by an unprecedented multi-faceted technology, show the cross-species transplant merged with the

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